Law Enforcement

Toledo Ohio Police Officers Enter Heavy Gunfire to Save Lives [VIDEO]

Combined Shape

The opening images on an officer-worn body cam video tells you all you need to know about today’s American cops. As Toledo (OH) police officers arrive at a massive report of “300 people fighting in the streets,” you can hear sustained gunfire (don’t bother trying to count the shots). Young people sprint past the cops away from the firefight. They are scared, as they should be, escaping the danger.

What do the cops do when responding to a call of hundreds of people fighting in the street and multiple shots fired? The first thing the arriving officers do is run through the folks running away from the gunfire.

The cops are shouting at the fleeing people, “Go! Go! Find cover. Get! Move! Move!”

A suspect description broadcast over the radio is of a black male. From the officer’s arm seen on video while he is driving his patrol car, he appears to be white.

The officers confront a possible suspect. “Show me your hands. Don’t f***ing move!” The person shows his hands, doing the right thing. Assessing the person as not a danger, the officers move on to the next threat. Again, an officer shouts at people, “Move… find cover, find cover. Get down, get down, get down,” as the gunfire continues unabated.

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An officer radios the dispatcher, “We have multiple shooters—everywhere!” And the cops continue toward the gunfire, again yelling, “Stay down! Everybody, stay down.” They are worried about strangers’ safety more than their own. Why? Because it’s what cops do.

The officers pass several people hiding behind cars, and they continue to yell, “stay down, stay behind cover!”

The officers make no assumption those black people hiding behind cars and running away were the suspects. Those officers were “judging” people based on their behavior, not their skin color. “Get behind a car!” Officers shout, yet again.

According to WTOL, a dozen people were shot, including an 11-year-old and 17-year old identified as Stephon Johnson. Johnson died from his gunshot wounds.

Chief Kral lamented the lack of witness support in identifying the shooters. “We should be angry,” Kral said. “We need to come together as a community. We’ve seen violence like this in this country all year long, and now it’s hit home. Someone there knows who was shooting these guns.”

Yes, someone does. But as long as the criminal justice system continues to bend the knee to social justice, why would people cooperate? With bail funds and no-cash bail releasing criminals, it is not surprising to most people that police and the system as a whole will not be able to protect them.

 

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Steve Pomper is an author, freelance writer, and retired Seattle police officer. During his career, he served as a field training officer, on the Community Police Team, and as a mountain bike patrol coordinator. He’s written five books, including The Obama Gang and De-Policing America, and he is a contributor to the National Police Association and a freelance writer for The Tatum Report.

Originally from New England, he’s a Boston sports fan. He now lives in the Pacific Northwest with his wife, Jody, a retired firefighter. He enjoys spending time with his adult kids and three grandchildren.




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